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Course Offerings 2014-2015

Summer 2014

Registration is now open for summer 2014 online courses for Queen's or non-Queen's students. Film and Media is offering:

Non-Queen's students can apply at Arts and Science Online.

Notes

See the Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar for required courses, prerequisites and enrolment priorities.

For further information on course timetable, marks and deadlines, see the University Registrar.

See the Registration Guide for upper-year students.

Note: IDIS 210*, STSC 300*, STSC 309*, STSC 339*, STSC 381*, DEVS 305, INTS 326*, IDIS 311*, and IDIS 410* may be used as Optional Film units.

Note regarding production courses: Students are permitted to register in only one production course per year: FILM 351; FILM 352; FILM 355; FILM 365; FILM 375; FILM 385; FILM 410; FILM 451; FILM 460 Production Option.

Course Descriptions

Legend: Learning Hours

  • L -- Lectures
  • S -- Seminars
  • T -- Tutorials
  • Lb -- Lab
  • GL -- Group Learning
  • I -- Individual Instruction
  • O -- Online Activities
  • PS -- Private Study

Legend: Term

  • F -- Fall
  • W -- Winter
  • FW -- Fall & Winter
  • S -- Spring, May 5 – June 16
  • S -- Summer, July 2 – August 12

 
 

FILM 110/6.0/ FW: Film, Culture and Communication Introduction to analysis of film, television, new media and other related forms of contemporary culture. Includes classical and contemporary Hollywood cinema, Canadian film and television, alternatives in international cinema, as well as recent developments on the internet, in gaming, and in social media. Course is in blended model and includes lectures, online learning materials and weekly tutorials. Course requirements include online tests, written work and a digital storytelling project. LEARNING HOURS 240 (24L;36Lb;36T;48GL;48O;48PS) Instructors: Clarke Mackey, Dorit Naaman

IDIS 210/3.0/W: Arts in Society A broad-ranging introduction to the role arts play in human society with a focus on contemporary production and research. Through a series of guest speakers, students will engage with the arts' living practices embedded in social interaction addressing topics as wide-ranging as aesthetics, politics, race, representation, critical theory, and identities. NOTE Students will be required to attend a variety of arts events outside class time which may include concerts, gallery exhibitions, performances, film screenings. NOTE Administered by the Department of Film and Media. NOTE Field trips: estimated cost $75. LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24O;48PS) PREREQUISITE Level 2. Instructor: Matt Rogalsky

FILM 216*/3.0/F: Historical Inquiry Introduction to historical research and analysis of narrative and other films. Examines works, from a range of periods and settings, and the conditions that shaped their production, distribution and reception. In 2014, the course will focus on films of the silent era. LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48PS) PREREQUISITE (A grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0) or a (GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) or (BISC 100/3.0 and FILM104/3.0) and registration in a FILM Plan, STSC Specialization or COCA Specialization Plan. Instructor: Peter Baxter

FILM 226*/3.0 /W: Critical Inquiry Theoretical and textual analysis of narrative, experimental, documentary and art cinemas, including the examination of formal, aesthetic, and narrative techniques and conventions, and their production of meaning in social and political contexts. LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48PS) PREREQUISITE (A grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0) or a (GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) or (BISC 100/3.0 and FILM104/3.0) and registration in a FILM Plan, STSC Specialization or COCA Specialization Plan. Instructor: Scott MacKenzie

FILM 236*/3.0/: Media And Cultural Studies Introduction to cultural and social theory of film and other media as it relates to the tensions between citizenship and consumerism. Examines roles, functions, and impact of mass media technologies, institutions, and practices in both scholarly and practical forms. LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;24O;36PS) PREREQUISITE (A grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0) or a (GPA of 2.60 in BISC 100/4.0 and FILM 104/3.0 or FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) and registration in a FILM Plan, STSC Specialization or COCA Specialization Plan. Instructor: Susan Lord

FILM 240*/3.0/F: Media and Popular Culture Includes lessons on a variety of media and genres (including film, TV, radio, gaming, music, books, magazines, advertising, public relations, broadcast and print news media, social and mobile digital media). Students will study popular culture productions, consumptions, and representations in order to better understand the importance of mass media in shaping our identities, relationships, choices, imaginations, politics, cultural dynamics and futures. LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;36P;36O) PREREQUISITE None Instructor: Sidneyeve Matrix

FILM 240*/3.0/F/SECTION 700: Media and Popular Culture This section is run by CDS (Continuing and Distance Studies) Register online at CDS. Includes lessons on a variety of media and genres (including film, TV, radio, gaming, music, books, magazines, advertising, public relations, broadcast and print news media, social and mobile digital media). Students will study popular culture productions, consumptions, and representations in order to better understand the importance of mass media in shaping our identities, relationships, choices, imaginations, politics, cultural dynamics and futures. LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;36PS;36O) PREREQUISITE None Instructor: Sidneyeve Matrix

FILM 250 1-4/6.0/ FW: Fundamentals of Production This course provides a grounding in basic filmmaking concepts and techniques, including directing, lighting, sound recording, and editing. It is structured around a series of short narrative and documentary video exercises, done by small groups of students. Each student also writes a script for a short film in the Fall Term, and produces or directs a film in the Winter Term. LEARNING HOURS 216 (48L;24Lb;24O;120PS) PREREQUISITE (A grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0) or (a GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0) and (registration in a FILM MAJ/MEDIAL Plan, STSC Specialization or COCA Specialization Plan). Instructor: Derek Redmond

FILM 260*/3.0/S: Digital Media Theory and Practice This section is run by CDS (Continuing and Distance Studies) Register online at CDS. FILM 260 is a survey of selected topics in digital media theory and digital culture trends. We'll consider subjects including digital literacy and mobile technologies, viral videos to eReading, Facebook to Foursquare, online footprints and digital reputations to privacy concerns in the age of Google. We'll cover issues and ideas related to eCommerce, geosocial networking, online friendship, educational technology, the app revolution, word-of-mouth social media marketing, and emergent forms of digital creativity. The key themes for this course are: media convergence, virtual identity, digital mobilities, wikinomics, and socialnomics. NOTE Only offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies. LEARNING HOURS 108 (18L;90O) PREREQUISITE None Instructor: Sidneyeve Matrix


 
 
 

FILM 300*/3.0/F: Hollywood: The Dream Factory This course examines Classical Hollywood Cinema from the early 1940s until its demise at the end of the 1950s. We will consider the role played by the Studio System, the effects of the Great Depression, World War II and the Communist Witch Hunt. Along with critical, theoretical and historical readings, we will examine such key documents as the Motion Picture Production Code, which shaped to a great degree what we know think of as Classical Hollywood Cinema. LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48PS) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in each of FILM 110/6.0 and FILM 250/6.0) and 6.0 units in FILM at the 200-level. Instructor: Scott MacKenzie

STSC 300*/3.0/F: Stage and Screen Practical course for Stage and Screen students which compares the production process of live theatre with that of film and television. Through a series of exercises, students will learn the fundamentals for writing, directing, acting and editing dramatic works for stage and screen. Enrolment is limited. NOTE Production supplies $50. PREREQUISITE FILM 250/6.0 and (DRAM 237/3.0 or DRAM 238/3.0) and DRAM 251/3.0. Instructor: CarolAnn Reid

FILM 302/3.0/F: Genre Intermediate examination of generic convention, iconography, relations to modes of production and to audience, and historical dimensions, this year concentrating on the Western. André Bazin called the Western "the American film par excellence," and it has persisted as an expressive format of the modern era, crossing boundaries of race, gender, nation, and history. This course includes examples from the classical Hollywood period, before the 1960s, and from the more contemporary era—from Stagecoach to Dead Man. LEARNING HOURS 108(36L;24Lb;48PS) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0 or GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0 or BISC 100/3.0 and FILM104/3.0) and 6.0 units in FILM in FILM at the 200-level. Instructor: Blaine Allan

FILM 303/3.0/W: National and International Cinema Intermediate examination of a national cinema or the cinemas of more than one nation. Topic in 2015: Transnational Arctic Cinemas. We will examine fiction, documentary, animation and experimental films from early cinema, Hollywood, the USSR, the Nordic countries and Canada. LEARNING HOURS 108(36L;24Lb;48PS) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0 or GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0 or BISC 100/3.0 and FILM104/3.0) and 6.0 units in FILM in FILM at the 200-level. Instructor: Scott MacKenzie

FILM 305/3.0/W: European Narrative This course will focus on postwar Italian cinema, seeking to use that cinema to explore issues of Italian nationhood and identity over the past fifty plus years. The course has been organized in terms of six crucial moments in postwar Italy: the immediate postwar period; the "economic miracle" of the 1950s and early 1960s; the revolutionary 1960s; the "disillusionary" 1970s; the 1980s and Italian postmodernity; and the 1990s to the present: globalization, immigration to Italy, the death of communism, the era of Silvio Berlusconi, and Italy's crises en route to joining the European Union. LEARNING HOURS 108(36L;24Lb;48PS) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0 or GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0 or BISC 100/3.0 and FILM104/3.0) and 6.0 units in FILM in FILM at the 200-level. Instructor: Frank Burke

DEVS 305*/6.0/W: Cuban Culture and Society This course is designed to introduce students to Cuban society and culture. The course will focus especially on the period from the Cuban revolution (1959) to the present. Students will examine some of the main events and highlights of Cuban history, politics and culture in this era. Two weeks of this course will take place in Cuba at the University of Havana. Session dates: Queen's portion: regular Winter Term, beginning Jan 2014, 3 hrs weekly, Thursday 6:30 -9:30 Havana portion: Saturday, May 3 - Sunday May 18, 2014. Registration will be open after successful applicants are accepted in the course, 4 October 2013. Deadlines: Fri 27: September application due Fri 4: October successful applicants notified Fri 11 :October $200 deposit due NOTES 1 Students are expected to pay an ancillary fee for travel, site visits and two weeks accommodation while in Havana -- approximately $2300.00. 2 Students must apply to take the course. Applications are available in the DEVS office. 3 Students are expected to complete the pre-departure and safety orientation online. 4 Costs and application deadlines will be posted on the DEVS website. PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above and registration in any Arts and Science Plan. Instructor: Susan Lord

STSC 309*/3.0/F: Special Topics in Stage and Screen
See Note: 3 consecutive weekends

An intensive, practical workshop on community-based, celebratory performance and integrated media lead by Stage and Screen visiting artists John Fox and Sue Gill. Fox and Gill founded and ran the UK performance group Welfare State International for 40 years. Their work is the subject of the book Engineers of the Imagination by Tony Coult and Baz Kershaw. In Canada they are known for the innovative outdoor show Tempest on Snake Island. See more information on the artists.
NOTE: This intensive course is offered over three weekends - October 25-26, November 1-2, and 8-9, Saturday and Sunday only, 11:00 am to 6:00 pm each day. PREREQUISITE (12 units from DRAM 201/3.0, DRAM 202/3.0, DRAM 205/3.0, DRAM 237/3.0, DRAM 238/3.0, DRAM 251/3.0) or (12 units from FILM 206/3.0, FILMS 216/3.0, FILM 226/3.0, FILM 236/3.0, FILM 240/3.0, FILM 250/6.0) or permission of the Departments of Drama and Film and Media Instructors: John Fox and Sue Gill (course coordinator: Clarke Mackey)

IDIS 311/3.0/F: Sound Production A production class exploring the formal concepts, historical underpinnings, and technical tools used in the production of independent sound works, or in the production of more elaborate sound components for video, film or theatrical projects. NOTE Administered by the Department of Film and Media PREREQUISITE Level 3 or above Instructor: Matt Rogalsky

FILM 312*/3.0/F: Screenwriting Students will analyze examples from existing works and prepare a ten-minute original screenplay. Assignments include proposal, outline, treatment, dialogue scene, first draft and final manuscript. Each assignment in the screenwriting process will be presented and work shopped by the class. PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in each of FILM 110/6.0 and FILM 250/6.0) and 6.0 units in FILM at the 200-level. LEARNING HOURS 108(36L;72PS) Instructor: Frances Leeming

FILM 312/3.0/W: Screenwriting Students will analyze examples from existing works and prepare a ten-minute original screenplay. Assignments include proposal, outline, treatment, dialogue scene, first draft and final manuscript. Each assignment in the screenwriting process will be presented and work shopped by the class. PREREQUISITE PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0) and 6.0 units in FILM. LEARNING HOURS 108(36L;72PS) Instructor: Frances Leeming

FILM 320*/3.0/W: Media and the Arts This course will explore contemporary digital culture, including the various ways it has transformed the manner in which art and other cultural forms of expression are made, distributed and received. We will address storytelling, interactivity, the impact on politics, digital aesthetics, and other associated topics. There will be a limited and optional opportunity for students to produce an artwork to fulfill class requirements. PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in each of FILM 110/6.0 and FILM 250/6.0) and 6.0 units in FILM at the 200-level. LEARNING HOURS 108(36L;24Lb;48PS) Instructor: Gary Kibbins

FILM 323*/3.0/W: Contemporary Canadian Film and Television Intermediate examination of film and television in Canada since 1980, taking into account regional difference and other cultural, political, and economic distinctions. The early 1980s marked significant change in the institutions of Canadian cinema and TV: the Capital Cost Allowance withered, Telefilm Canada rose from the ashes of the Canadian Film Development Corporation, the television dial expanded, and support for public broadcasting eroded. As well, the years since brought to prominence names -- Arcand, Finkleman, Mehta, Binamé, Maddin, Ricky, Julian, and Bubbles -- now emblems of an internationalised Canadian moving-image culture. LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48PS) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0 or GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0 or BISC 100/3.0 and FILM104/3.0) and 6.0 units in FILM in FILM at the 200-level. Instructor: Blaine Allan

FILM 335*/3.0/F: Culture and Technology Research and studies in relations of media, technology, and culture. Critical examination of cultural and communication technologies and the employment of technology within selected examples from film, television, and digital media. LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;24Lb;48PS) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0 or GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0 or BISC 100/3.0 and FILM104/3.0) and 6.0 units in FILM at the 200-level. Instructor: Scott MacKenzie

FILM 336*/3.0/F: Film and Politics Intermediate examination of the historical and critical relation between film and politics or political ideologies. Examples will be drawn from both narrative and non-narrative traditions. PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0 or GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0 or BISC 100/3.0 and FILM104/3.0) and 6.0 units in FILM at the 200-level. LEARNING HOURS 108(36L;24Lb;48PS) Instructor: TF

FILM 338/3.0/W: Contemporary Issues in Cultural Studies An intermediate study of key concepts in cultural studies investigated through cultural practices and/or national contexts from the 1960s to the present. LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;12GL;12OCA;60PS) PREREQUISITE FILM 236/3.0, FILM 240/3.0 or FILM 260/3.0. Instructor: Keren Zaiontz

STSC 339*/3.0/W: Media and Performance An intermediate study that examines how performance shapes our social experiences and lived identities. From the daily acts of self-performance on social media to the ‘once in a life time' performances in the Olympic Games, performance binds contemporary cultural practices, small and large. Students will be required to attend a limited number of Kingston-based cultural productions over the course of the semester. The cost will not exceed 50.00 per student. LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;12GL;12OCA;60PS) PREREQUISITE 3rd year standing in DRAM, FILM or STSC Instructor: Keren Zaiontz

FILM 340*/3.0/W: Advertising and Consumer Culture Course reviews print, online, outdoor, and television advertising strategies to understand the construction of consumer culture and citizenship. Critically examines the historical evolution of integrated marketing and communications and public relations in North America. Students participate online in a weekly live webinar lecture or opt to watch the recording later on-demand. Assignments include online quizzes, moodle discussion forum participation, a short reflective writing assignment, and some creative design work. LEARNING HOURS 108 (36L;72PS) NOTE Also offered as a distance course. Consult Continuing and Distance Studies: http://www.queensu.ca/artsci_online/ PREREQUISITE FILM 110 or FILM 240 or FILM 260 or COMM 131 Instructor: Sidneyeve Matrix

FILM 355A/B/6.0/FW: Documentary Theory and Practice A course which combines study of the history and theory of documentary film with the production of documentary videos. Requirements will include both research essays as well as the conceptualization and production of a documentary video or film. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 351/3.0; FILM 352/3.0; FILM 355/6.0; FILM 365/6.0; FILM 375/6.0; FILM 385/6.0; FILM 410/3.0; FILM 451/3.0. LEARNING HOURS 240 (36L;36S;48Lb;48G;72PS) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM Maj/Med or SPF Plan and (a grade of B- in each of FILM 110/6.0 and FILM 250/6.0) and 6.0 units in FILM and registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, or COCA Specialization or STSC Specialization Plan. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 351; FILM 352; FILM 355; FILM 365; FILM 375; FILM 385; FILM 410; FILM 451; FILM 460 Production Option. Instructor: Dorit Naaman

FILM 365A/B/6.0/FW: Narrative Theory and Practice In this advanced course in narrative film and television we will combine contemporary critical and theoretical approaches with practical experiences. Students will have the opportunity to explore, discuss and write about modern narrative media while producing a short narrative work that incorporates their understandings. The major assignments will be an essay in first term and a group presentation in second term. In addition, working in groups of three or four, students will produce short, professional quality videos (maximum length 8 minutes) for a public screening. Commercial production methods will be explored, including proposal pitches, creative collaboration and meeting strict deadlines. Each student will have significant creative responsibility for their production as one or more of the following: writer, producer, director, videographer, sound designer, or editor. A series of advanced skills workshops and analysis of many existing movies and televisions programs will be featured. This course is particularly well suited to students in the Stage and Screen Program. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 351; FILM 352; FILM 355; FILM 365; FILM 375; FILM 385; FILM 410; FILM 451; FILM 460 Production Option. LEARNING HOURS 240 (36L;36S;48Lb;48G;72PS) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM Maj/Med or SPF Plan and (a grade of B- in each of FILM 110/6.0 and FILM 250/6.0) and 6.0 units in FILM. Instructor: Clarke Mackey

FILM 385A/B/6.0/FW: Animation Theory and Practice A course which combines study of the history and theory of film animation with the production of animated films. Requirements will include both research essays as well as the conceptualization and production of an animated film. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 351; FILM 352; FILM 355; FILM 365; FILM 375; FILM 385; FILM 410; FILM 451; FILM 460 Production Option. LEARNING HOURS 240 (36L;36S;48Lb;48G;72PS) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM Maj/Med or SPF Plan (FILM 110/6.0 and FILM 250/6.0 and 6.0 units in FILM at the 200-level) and registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, or COCA Specialization or STSC Specialization Plan. Instructor: Frances Leeming

FILM 395/3.0 : Internship Students can apply to undertake a practical internship in media production, criticism or curatorship. All internships must be approved in advance by application to the Undergraduate Coordinator. Approval will depend on the quality of the proposal and the academic record of the applicant. Students are required to write a report about their experience and are evaluated jointly by their employer and a faculty member from Film and Media. It is the responsibility of students, not the Department of Film and Media, to arrange internships. NOTE Students will be given a grade of Pass/Fail for work done. LEARNING HOURS 120 (120I) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in FILM 110/6.0 or GPA of 2.60 in FILM 104/3.0 and FILM 106/3.0 or BISC 100/3.0 and FILM104/3.0) and 6.0 units in FILM at the 200-level.


 
 
 

FILM 400-1/3.0/W: Special Topics in Film, Media, and Cultural Studies: Authorship Advanced seminar on film authorship and analysis. Orson Welles, with the legendary Citizen Kane, and Nicholas Ray, with the highly acclaimed They Live By Night, both started their careers as film directors in the Hollywood studio system, and both ended as maverick independents, shut out of the mainstream. Examining them through their lives and careers, this comparative discussion draws on the work that each undertook over four decades. LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;12GL;12OCA;36PS) PREREQUISITE Level 4 and registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan (a GPA of 2.6 in FILM) and (18.0 units in FILM). Instructor: Blaine Allan

FILM 400-2/3.0/W: Special Topics in Film, Media, and Cultural Studies: Narrative Film "Film Manifestos and Global Cinema Cultures." This course examines film manifestos from the major European "waves" and figures (Eisenstein, Truffaut, Bergman, Free Cinema, Oberhausen, Dogme '95); Latin American Third Cinemas (Birri, Sanjinés, Espinosa, Solanas); radical art and the avant-garde (Buñuel, Brakhage, Deren, Mekas, Ono, Sanborn); and world cinemas (Iimura, Makhmalbaf, Sembene, Sen). We shall also address documentary cinema, aesthetics, feminist and queer film cultures, pornography, film archives, Hollywood, and film and digital media. LEARNING HOURS HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;12GL;12OCA;36PS) PREREQUISITE Level 4 and registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan (GPA of 2.6 in FILM) and (18.0 units in FILM). Instructor: Scott MacKenzie

FILM 400-3/3.0/W: Special Topics in Film, Media, and Cultural Studies: Culture & Representation Future Visions – Science Fiction and Alternative Social Models. How do we imagine that "another world is possible"? This course will investigate "visions of the future" in culture and films at the intersection of science fiction movies and social movement documentaries. Our "sense of place and sense of planet" are expressed in both these narrative forms which articulate the here and now and connect us to the potential future. Science fiction allows us to rethink latent emerging possibilities through posing "what if" scenarios. The genre has influenced cultural discourse, as seen in films across the last century from Metropolis to Brazil. At the same time many Hollywood movies present a xenophobic, fear of 'the other.' However, feminist, queer and post-colonial science fiction writers have embraced the genre as a space to propose hybrid identities and alternative dreams. LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;12GL;12OCA;36PS) PREREQUISITE Level 4 and registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan (a GPA of 2.6 in FILM) and (18.0 units in FILM). Instructor: TBA

FILM 402/3.0/FW: Research Seminar and Workshop This research and workshop based course will focus on a wide variety of research practices. Queen's faculty members and visiting speakers will give guest talks on their creative works, research practices and methodologies, accessing archival material, and on making creative and practical research available beyond the academic environment. LEARNING HOURS 120(36L;24LB;36ONA;24OCA) PREREQUISITE Level 4 and registration in a Major or Medial Plan, or COCA Specialization or STSC Specialization Plan (a GPA of 2.6 in FILM) and (18.0 units in FILM). Instructor: Susan Lord

FILM 410/3.0 /W: Video Production for Digital Media Advanced work in video and computer media. Assignments include the production of digital video projects, undertaken individually and in groups. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 351; FILM 352; FILM 355; FILM 365; FILM 375; FILM 385; FILM 410; FILM 451; FILM 460 Production Option. LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;60P) CORE REQUIREMENT 4th Year standing in COCA PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in each of FILM 110/6.0 and FILM 250/6.0) and 18.0 units in FILM and registration in a FILM Major or Medial Plan, or COCA Specialization or STSC Specialization Plan. Instructor: TBA

IDIS 410*/6.0/F: Contemporary Cultural Performance in Practice Students in film, visual art, drama, and music explore new modes of interdisciplinary performance practice through the creation of a collective work performed in public. Enrolment is limited. NOTE Administered by the Department of Film and Media. CORE REQUIREMENT Level 4 in STSC Specialization PREREQUISITE Level 4 in a FILM, ARTF, DRAM or MUSC Plan. Instructor: Matt Rogalsky, Kim Renders, Rebecca Anweiler

FILM 450*/3.0/F: Production: Special Topic I: The Business of Media Covers the major financial aspects of media production: budgeting, raising money - private and public, production management, distribution and marketing. Course also looks at how emerging technologies are rapidly changing how things are done, and how media producers will be working in the future. LEARNING HOURS 120 (36L;24Lb;60P) PREREQUISITE A GPA of 2.6 in FILM and (a grade of B- in each of FILM 110/6.0 and FILM 250/6.0) and 18.0 units in FILM and registration in a FILM Plan, or COCA Specialization or STSC Specialization Plan. Instructor: Alex Jansen

FILM 460/6.0/F: Major Project Seminar that draws on students' previous work to enhance advanced research, production and writing for final projects in creative writing, criticism, journalism, production and/or curating and programming film media, and digital culture. Topics from theory, criticism, and history of film, media, digital culture, film festivals, media arts exhibitions and museums will be addressed to suit individuals. Examples from narrative, documentary, experimental film or digital media art will be analyzed. Student projects will be published online and/or exhibited at the new Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing Arts. NOTE Students may enroll in no more than one production course per academic year: FILM 351; FILM 352; FILM 355; FILM 365; FILM 375; FILM 385; FILM 410; FILM 451; FILM 460 Production Option. LEARNING HOURS 228 (36L;24GL;36ONA;120PS) PREREQUISITE Level 4 and registration in a FILM Major Plan and (a GPA of 2.8 in FILM) and 18.0 units in FILM). Instructors: Gary Kibbins ; Frank Burke ; TF


 
 
 


For further information on preregistration, course timetable, marks and deadlines, see the University Registrar.

See the Faculty of Arts and Science Calendar for a full listing of courses, regulations and requirements.

Students with questions or problems regarding courses, registration or timetables should contact the Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies, at (613) 533-2178.

 
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